community April 12, 2011

Stack Exchange Partners with MathJax

I’m pleased to announce that Stack Exchange is now a major supporting partner of MathJax. MathJax is, of course, an open source JavaScript display engine for mathematics that works in all modern browsers. It’s a joint project of the American Mathematical Society, Design Science, Inc., and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. We love…
Avatar for Jeff Atwood
Co-Founder (Former)

I’m pleased to announce that Stack Exchange is now a major supporting partner of MathJax.

MathJax is, of course, an open source JavaScript display engine for mathematics that works in all modern browsers. It’s a joint project of the American Mathematical Society, Design Science, Inc., and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

We love MathJax, and we use it on six sites in the Stack Exchange network so far with great success:

Quantitative Finance
Q&A; for finance professionals and academics

Electronics Design
Q&A; for electronic hardware hacking enthusiasts

Statistical Analysis
Q&A; for statisticians, data analysts, data miners and data visualization experts

Physics
Q&A; for active researchers, academics and students of physics

Mathematics
Q&A; for people studying math at any level and professionals in related fields

Theoretical Computer Science
Q&A; for theoretical computer scientists and researchers in related fields

It turns out math is kind of … important … to a lot of the hard science communities. Who knew?

Purity

We were thrilled to be able to apply some of our VC unicorn dollars toward making MathJax a great open source tool for rendering math in web browsers — not just on our communities, but across the whole of the internet. That’s our fundamental mission: to make the internet better for everyone.

It is quite an honor to be on the sponsors page alongside organizations like Project Euclid and The American Physical Society. That’s the kind of company I am very happy to keep.

If you’d like to test out math notation on one of our sites, refer to a LaTeX2 mathematical notation reference and remember that $$ and $$ are the delimiters that indicate when you enter and leave LaTeX2 mode.

Pause a few seconds for the real-time preview to kick in and see what kind of math you’ve wrought in your answer. Or, just view MathJax in action on the existing Q&A; at quant, electronics, stats, physics, cstheory, and of course math. Click the edit link (recently made available to all users) on any post to see the underlying markup.

Enjoy! We’ll be working closely with the MathJax team to fold back in any feedback, enhancements, or improvements we come up with for the greater math community.

Podcast logo The Stack Overflow Podcast is a weekly conversation about working in software development, learning to code, and the art and culture of computer programming.

Related

company May 7, 2020

A message from our CEO: The Way Forward

This is a key moment in our company’s history, as the whole world is dealing with significant uncertainty. Know that you are not alone. We are facing this situation together. Our goal is to stay focused on living our core values and actively connect with teammates, our community, and our customers.
December 5, 2019

New post notices: Improving feedback on Stack Overflow questions

We know that giving our community mechanisms for sharing and receiving feedback is important. In her recent blog post, Meg Risdal described some of the ways that our Public Q&A product team is working to improve the way our system helps users share and receive feedback. I’m pleased to announce that starting today we are…
Avatar for Yaakov Ellis
Principal Web Developer, Community