company April 9, 2019

The 2019 Stack Overflow Developer Survey Results Are In

We’ve been working hard for months, and today the Developer Survey results for 2019 are live. This year marks the ninth year we’ve published our annual Developer Survey, and nearly 90,000 developers took the 20-minute survey earlier this year. See the results for yourself! What are some of this year’s key results? Python, the fastest-growing…
Avatar for Julia Silge
Data Scientist (former)
We’ve been working hard for months, and today the Developer Survey results for 2019 are live. This year marks the ninth year we’ve published our annual Developer Survey, and nearly 90,000 developers took the 20-minute survey earlier this year.

See the results for yourself!

What are some of this year’s key results?

  • Python, the fastest-growing major programming language, has risen in the ranks of programming languages in our survey yet again, edging out Java this year and standing as the second most loved language (behind Rust).
  • Over half of respondents had written their first line of code by the time they were sixteen, although this experience varies by country and by gender.
  • We asked respondents to think about the last time they solved coding problems with and without our site. The data indicates that Stack Overflow saves a developer 30 to 90 minutes of time per week!
Dig into the full report to learn more about developer salaries, how optimistic developers are, the best music to listen to while coding, and more.

Stack Overflow’s annual Developer Survey is the largest and most comprehensive survey of people who code around the world, but our results don’t represent everyone in the developer community evenly. We have further work to do to make Stack Overflow the welcoming, inclusive, and diverse platform we want it to be, and this is reflected in our survey sample. We are committed to building on steps we’ve taken in the past year and improving in this area this year and beyond. Some of these survey results directly guide those efforts.

To address these characteristics of our survey sample, we often summarize results by country or gender, highlight results for underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, or use survey weighting to correct for demographic skew. Be sure to check out where we’ve pointed out these kinds of differences.

We’ll make the anonymized results of this year’s survey publicly available under the Open Database License (ODbL) in May. Until then, you can access the data sets from previous years. Have questions or feedback? Head over to Meta and use the [survey-2019] tag.
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