newsletter March 6, 2020

The Overflow #12: Plain text

Welcome to ISSUE #12 of The Overflow, a newsletter by developers, for developers, written and curated by the Stack Overflow team and Cassidy Williams of React Training. You can read more about it here. In this week's newsletter, we're seeing what's up with Blazor, wondering if it's legal to crack MD5 hashes, and making the most of our JavaScript console.

Welcome to ISSUE #12 of The Overflow, a newsletter by developers, for developers, written and curated by the Stack Overflow team and Cassidy Williams of React Training. You can read more about it here. In this week’s newsletter, we’re seeing what’s up with Blazor, wondering if it’s legal to crack MD5 hashes, and making the most of our JavaScript console

From the blog

Podcast: Anil Dash talks container orchestration and Fog Creek Software’s ongoing legacy stackoverflow.blog
This week we chat with Anil Dash, CEO of Glitch and board member here at Stack Overflow. He breaks down the tech behind Glitch apps, explains why the company is launching an online magazine called Glimmer, and talks about the fight to keep the web weird, fun, and open to all.

What’s behind the hype about Blazor? stackoverflow.blog
Blazor is a new client-side UI framework from the ASP.NET team. Its big selling point is the ability to write rich web UI experiences using C# instead of JavaScript—something a lot of developers have been dreaming of.

Build vs. buy: Adding chat to your app through Pusher’s API promotion
In-app chat is picking up momentum. People are increasingly asking for social interaction to play a part in marketplace and on-demand service apps. When it comes to customer support, chat has long been a standard for websites, and it’s now gaining traction in mobile apps

Interesting questions

Found a good question or answer? Share it with the hashtag #StackOverflowKnows. We’ll include our favorites in the future.

Is it legal to crack MD5 hashes? law.stackexchange.com
Just in case you’re thinking about trying to recover your password in the most difficult possible manner.

Why is the half life of radioactive material so predictable? physics.stackexchange.com
Random chance with a side of scientific probability.

Are there any dangerous commands in LaTeX? tex.stackexchange.com
While LaTeX might be great for scientific notation, you do have to be careful about a couple of commands.

If I send a plaintext email using Gmail to somebody, including my PGP public key block, is that secure? security.stackexchange.com
If you’re trying to encrypt your emails, maybe sending the decryption key as plaintext isn’t the best idea.

Is there a name for the class of algorithms that are the most efficient for a particular task? cs.stackexchange.com
Other than super awesome algorithms.

Links from around the web

A guide to console commands css-tricks.com
How do you comfort a JavaScript log? You console it! Here’s a great guide to console commands you might not know about.

Souping up VS Code as a markdown notebook kortina.nyc
There’s so many note-taking apps out there, it’s hard to decide what to use. Take a look at this a fascinating, code-driven blog post on how to make VSCode (of all things) the ideal markdown notebook.

dotSwift 2020 presentation playlist www.youtube.com
dotSwift 2020 took place in France this past month. If you’d like to see the talks, they have all been uploaded to Youtube in this handy dandy playlist.

Aborting a fetch request meetguns.com
Though this technology for aborting fetch requests is still new and experimental, we’re personally really excited to see it come to fruition.

Building and pushing a docker image to Amazon ECR with GitHub Actions dev.to
GitHub Actions, AWS, Docker, oh my! Here’s a great article about how to use these technologies together to make a workflow for your projects.

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Podcast logo The Stack Overflow Podcast is a weekly conversation about working in software development, learning to code, and the art and culture of computer programming.

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