Ryan Donovan

Ryan Donovan helps run editorial for the Stack Overflow blog. He's spend over 15 years as a technical writer embedded in software development teams across multiple industries. He lives in New York City and hopes to meet your dog some day.
code-for-a-living May 29, 2020

The Overflow #23: Nerding out over a puzzle

May 2020 Welcome to ISSUE #23 of the Overflow! This newsletter is by developers, for developers, written and curated by the Stack Overflow team and Cassidy Williams at Netlify. Check the wealth of tiny startups doing good work, the puzzle of keyfiles, and the wonder of the miracle sudoku. From the blog You want efficient…
newsletter May 22, 2020

The Overflow #22: The power of sharing

May 2020 Welcome to ISSUE #22 of the Overflow! This newsletter is by developers, for developers, written and curated by the Stack Overflow team and Cassidy Williams at Netlify. We’re pondering the benefits of sharing your work, pushing the limits of children’s names, and praising accessibility in the time of Covid-19. From the blog Ensuring…
He's about to steal some code and write a game changing application.
code-for-a-living May 20, 2020

Good coders borrow, great coders steal

Copying and pasting can be dangerous, but then again, so can many aspects of software development when done incautiously. In this post, I’ll take a look at what code copying actually means for software development, what good code theft means, and the pitfalls of copying badly.
code-for-a-living May 15, 2020

The Overflow #21: The way forward

May 2020 Welcome to ISSUE #21 of The Overflow! Cheers! Have a beverage with our newsletter by developers, for developers, written and curated by the Stack Overflow team and Cassidy Williams at Netlify. Behold! Discussing privacy concerns in contract tracing apps, a lonely sample size of one, and email sender reputation. From the blog A…
code-for-a-living May 8, 2020

The Overflow #20: Sharpen your skills

May 2020 Welcome to ISSUE #20 of The Overflow! That feels like a milestone to us, and we’re gonna celebrate by giving you a newsletter by developers, for developers, written and curated by the Stack Overflow team and Cassidy Williams at Netlify. We’re skilling up, putting breadcrumbs down, and virtually speaking out. From the blog…
code-for-a-living May 1, 2020

The Overflow #19: Jokes on us

April 2020 Hey nineteen! Welcome to ISSUE #19 of The Overflow, a newsletter by developers, for developers, written and curated by the Stack Overflow team and Cassidy Williams at Netlify. We can’t dance together, but we can fill our heads with delightful information. This week, COBOL rides again, random sampling to determine infection rates, and…
code-for-a-living April 24, 2020

The Overflow #18: Changing traffic patterns

April 2020 Welcome to ISSUE #18 of The Overflow, a newsletter by developers, for developers, written and curated by the Stack Overflow team and Cassidy Williams at Netlify. This week, stay in the Loop with our feedback frameworks, remembering John Conway’s achievements, and the CEO who moved to the ER. From the blog The Loop:…
code-for-a-living April 23, 2020

The final Python 2 release marks the end of an era

For you Python users who have been unwilling (or unable) to upgrade to version 3, there’s yet another reason to get motivated: python.org has released Python 2.7.18, the absolute last official release for Python 2.  While it doesn’t add much in terms of features, it does act as a milestone. This release comes after official…
newsletter April 17, 2020

The Overflow #17: Legally beige

April 2020 Welcome to ISSUE #17 of The Overflow, a newsletter by developers, for developers, written and curated by the Stack Overflow team and Cassidy Williams. Just like the white winged dove, you’re on the edge of newsletter seventeen. This week, we’re introducing a robot that flags unfriendly comments, checking a US nickel’s magnetism, and…
code-for-a-living April 13, 2020

Socializing with co-workers while social distancing

As we increase our social distancing efforts and have fewer people around us, building connections and socializing becomes ever more important for our mental health. We spend a lot of time at work and a decreasing amount of time socializing outside of it, so turning some of that work time into a social time can serve two purposes. For it to be effective, though, you can’t just push socializing initiatives alone.