stackoverflowknows February 28, 2020

This week, #StackOverflowKnows outlaw wifi, GPU weakness, and neutrinos per second

Time is on the March and we are ready to Spring into action (you see what we did there). And that means we’re planting a new crop of questions for you. This week, we look at the billions of neutrinos streaming through your body, why telegraphs used STOP instead of punctuation, and the asteroids that…

Time is on the March and we are ready to Spring into action (you see what we did there). And that means we’re planting a new crop of questions for you. This week, we look at the billions of neutrinos streaming through your body, why telegraphs used STOP instead of punctuation, and the asteroids that NASA has their eyes on. 

What is the evidence for ‘billions of neutrinos pass through your body every second’? 

physics.stackexchange.com

While we can’t detect ’em all, the math says that they’re there. Read more on how to calculate the 99.9999999% undetected neutrinos passing through you.  

What are GPUs bad at?

 cs.stackexchange.com

GPUs. Notoriously bad single-taskers. 

With the rise of machine learning, GPUs are all the rage. If your CPU is feeling jealous, here’s a reminder of all the things GPUs aren’t good at. 

Why exactly did telegraphs have to use “STOP” instead of a period and “QUOTE” instead of a quotation mark? (Or special codes.)

history.stackexchange.com

How do you know when STOP is the end of a sentence STOP and not just the word STOP STOP?

Can a university legally enforce a policy preventing students from creating their own wireless networks? 

law.stackexchange.com

Is university wi-fi the new pirate radio? Depends on whether you believe wireless signals can be charged with trespassing. 

Why not explore Cruithne? 

space.stackexchange.com

Apparently NASA has decided there are 16831 more interesting destinations. Choose local for your next near-earth asteroid visit.

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