newsletter February 21, 2020

The Overflow #11: Efficiently lazy

February 2020 Welcome to ISSUE #11 of The Overflow, a newsletter by developers, for developers, written and curated by the Stack Overflow team and Cassidy Williams of React Training. You can read more about it here. In this week’s newsletter, we’re efficiently lazy, calculating probabilities in chocolates, and thinking about how to maintain open source.…

Welcome to ISSUE #11 of The Overflow, a newsletter by developers, for developers, written and curated by the Stack Overflow team and Cassidy Williams of React Training. You can read more about it here. In this week’s newsletter, we’re efficiently lazy, calculating probabilities in chocolates, and thinking about how to maintain open source.

From the blog

When laziness is efficient: Make the most of your command line stackoverflow.blog
If you’re looking to get faster and more efficient on your command line, take a few tips from a lazy DevOps pro. You’ll be a terminal wizard in no time.

Podcast: Coaching a Developer Interview stackoverflow.blog
We try to climb the teetering tower of abstraction, examine a human readable magazine on computing, and prepare for Y2038.

Take the 2020 Developer Survey
Technology changes so much every year. So do the people creating it. Fill out our Developer Survey and tell us how you code in 2020.

Couchbase – Power of SQL with the flexibility of JSON promotion
Couchbase is an open source NoSQL database that gives developers unmatched flexibility. It supports SQL and analytical queries for JSON data and technologies including Kubernetes, Java, .NET, JavaScript, Go, and Python. Start using it for free now.

Interesting questions

Found a good question or answer? Share it with the hashtag #StackOverflowKnows. We’ll include our favorites in the future.

Result object vs throwing exceptions softwareengineering.stackexchange.com
When a losing ticket for the lottery might be a ‘happy path’

How do I make an infinite empty loop that won’t be optimized away? stackoverflow.com
Stop optimizing away my infinite loops, you guys!

Probability of collecting 5 of 5 tickets by buying 7 chocolates? math.stackexchange.com
Research is as good a reason as any to start buying chocolate.

How do we convey scale in 2D games? gamedev.stackexchange.com
Without one of the three dimensions, what’s keeping 2D games from being big flat messes?

What prevents me from setting up an A name entry for “google.ca” to whatever IP I want? superuser.com
Nothing is stopping you. However, nobody will see your entry either.

Links from around the web

CO2 emissions on the web dannyvankooten.com
Here’s something you might not have thought about before: the CO2 emissions your website produces! This is a great blog with lots of resources to get you thinking more about efficiency and hosting.

HTML attributes to improve your users’ two factor authentication experience twilio.com
Yes, 2-factor authentication is secure, but it can be a pain sometimes! Here’s a great post on how to make life a little easier on users who have it enabled on your sites.

Under Discussion: The maintenance of open-source projects welcometothejungle.com
We all use open source libraries at some point in our careers as developers. But what does it take to keep them current?

Understanding the Node.js event loop phases and how it executes the JavaScript code. dev.to
This is a really solid look into the architecture of the Node.js event loop, which is an important topic to understand if you’re working on Node-driven projects!

Deep Linking in React Native arsfutura.co
Here’s a deeper (pun intended) explanation of what they are, and how to build them into React Native apps.

Can an 80s computer beat a new one at Chess?! Amiga vs Mac ♟🕹️ 1987 vs 2020 youtube.com
What happens when you try to use a 1987 Commodore Amiga 500 chess AI to beat a 2019 MacBook at chess? Luckily, these people found the answer.

Tags: , ,
Podcast logo The Stack Overflow Podcast is a weekly conversation about working in software development, learning to code, and the art and culture of computer programming.

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