stackoverflowknows March 13, 2020

This week, #StackOverflowKnows molecule rings, infected laptops, and HMAC limits

These may be uncertain times, so we’ve all got questions. And on Stack Overflow and our exchanges, we’ve got a ton of great questions with fantastic answers. This week, we compare SSH with HTTPS, practice good document hygiene, and wonder if it would be dark inside the sun.  Why is SSH safer than HTTPS on…

These may be uncertain times, so we’ve all got questions. And on Stack Overflow and our exchanges, we’ve got a ton of great questions with fantastic answers. This week, we compare SSH with HTTPS, practice good document hygiene, and wonder if it would be dark inside the sun. 

Why is SSH safer than HTTPS on direct connections to a Git Repository with Credentials  

superuser.com

The analysis of SSH vs. HTTPS can be surprisingly complex for those not well versed in security systems analysis. While the transfer can have about the same security measures, you really find some differences in encryption key management. 

Do molecules with bridges through rings exist? 

chemistry.stackexchange.com

Building bridges and reinventing the wheel. Chemistry style. These atoms are like Evel Knievel over here, jumping through a flaming ring of PURE OXYGEN. 

Is it dangerous to pass documents from an old infected laptop to a new one?

security.stackexchange.com

When don’t want your content to go the wrong kind of viral, you should leave the documents on the infected laptop. Wash your hands of the whole machine. 

Is it dark inside the Sun? 

astronomy.stackexchange.com

Does the light of the sun reach inside the sun? It may seem silly at first, but plasma inside of stellar interiors can get pretty opaque. 

How many codes can I safely generate using the same HMAC key? 

crypto.stackexchange.com

Never fear, it would take a healthy 2^128 messages before you need be concerned. It’s unlikely that your computer would be able to generate that many codes before the sun collapses into a white dwarf. 

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