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podcast March 3, 2020

Podcast: Don’t Miss Your Stop

A Nigerian financial analyst with a habit of getting lost connects remotely with a Siberian app developer. Together, they would go on to build a mapping app worth $1 billion, all without ever meeting face to face.
Avatar for Ben Popper
Director of Content
code-for-a-living February 27, 2020

The eight factors of happiness for developers

I recently came across this sketchnote by Tanmay Vora, and it really resonated with me. As a developer it got me thinking about how this might translate into the life of a developer and our happiness. Based on this sketchnote here are the eight factors of happiness applied to developer life. 1. Resentment Harboring resentment…
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podcast February 25, 2020

Podcast – Anil Dash talks Glitch and Glimmer

This week we chat with Anil Dash, CEO of Glitch and board member here at Stack Overflow. He breaks down the tech behind Glitch apps, explains why the company is launching an online magazine called Glimmer, and talks about the fight to keep the web weird, fun, and open to all. Glitch, a platform that…
Avatar for Ben Popper
Director of Content
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newsletter February 21, 2020

The Overflow #11: Efficiently lazy

February 2020 Welcome to ISSUE #11 of The Overflow, a newsletter by developers, for developers, written and curated by the Stack Overflow team and Cassidy Williams of React Training. You can read more about it here. In this week’s newsletter, we’re efficiently lazy, calculating probabilities in chocolates, and thinking about how to maintain open source.…
code-for-a-living February 20, 2020

Requirements volatility is the core problem of software engineering

It's now been more than 50 years since the first IFIP Conference on Software Engineering, and in that time there have been many different software engineering methodologies, processes, and models proposed to help software developers achieve that predictable and cost-effective process. But 50 years later, we still seem to see the same kinds of problems we always have: late delivery, unsatisfactory results, and complete project failures.